Category Archives: Indie Spotlight

Indie Spotlight: Parnassus Books, Nashville TN

Ann Patchett, successful award-winning author and passionate promoter of independent bookstores all over the country,

Karen Hayes & Ann Patchett

has joined the growing number of authors who feel strongly about the value of independent bookstores so they open their own, in her case Parnassus Books in Nashville Tennessee (www.parnassusbooks.net), co-founded with publishing veteran Karen Hayes. We’re talking today with Mary Laura Philpott who writes the store’s lively blog “Musings” and has two middle-grade junior booksellers of her own.

Mixed-Up Files: What do you want people to experience at Parnassus? Describe an ideal day in the shop.
Mary Laura
: If you look around the store, you can see the experience that Ann Patchett and Karen Hayes, our owners, have in mind. It’s open and light and clean, but with plenty of interesting nooks and corners, and lots of comfy seating. There’s usually a shop dog or two lounging around, hoping for a reader to snuggle with. And depending on the day, we might set up chairs in front of our stage for a visiting author to come read and sign books. It’s meant to be more than just a store — a real hub for lovers of the written word of all ages.

MUF:With your owners’ experience in the publishing business, your store collection must be well curated. Do you and your community have some special areas of interest?
Mary Laura:
You’re right — curation is key, especially for a small store where there’s no room for filler. Our owners and buyers have gotten to know what local audience is interested in. Of course, new fiction and nonfiction are always popular. Nashville’s full of voracious readers, so customers tend to be aware of the latest literary buzz and come in looking for new titles they’ve read about. Not surprisingly, we have a well-stocked music section. And with the expansion of our shop in 2016, we were able to add not only more elbow room for browsing in all our sections, but also more space for children’s and YA titles.

MUFHow do you help kids select books? We’d like to know what titles, old or new, fiction or nonfiction, you find yourself recommending most often these days to readers aged 8-12.
Mary Laura:
Great question! Our manager of books for young readers is Stephanie Appell, who has a masters degree in library science with a focus on youth services and is a former teen librarian. She also just might be the most enthusiastic champion of children’s literature and YA literature I’ve ever met. She regularly meets with publishers to discuss what they’ve got coming up, but she also does a lot of her own research, via trade publications and blogs, to stay on top of the best and brightest new titles. All of our children’s booksellers are great at reading ahead so they can recommend the best new reads the minute the books come out.
You can follow along with our staff picks on Musing, our online magazine. Every month, there are some picks especially for young readers, chosen by our children’s booksellers as well as our junior booksellers — a few kids ranging from elementary to high school who help us out on weekends and holidays. (Two of them are my own kids, and they love choosing their staff picks!) https://parnassusmusing.net/category/staff-picks/

[Looking over these staff picks, we found lots of new or somehow overlooked titles to add to our teetering pile of books-to-read.  Fiction:  Breaking Stalin’s Nose by Eugene Yelchin, The Land of Forgotten Girls by Erin Entrada Kelly, Beautiful Blue World by Suzanne LeFleur,  The Girl Who Could Fly and The Boy Who Knew Everything by Victoria Foster, and Awkward  by Svetlana Chmkova.   Nonfiction: The Courage to Soar by Simone Biles, Maps by Aleksandra Mizielinska,  and March by John Lewis.]

MUF: Any events or activities coming up that would be of special interest to middle-graders?
Mary Laura: Yes! We are so excited about the launch of Andrew Maraniss’s Strong Inside: The True Story of How Perry Wallace Broke College Basketball’s Color Line. This is a middle grade adaptation of Andrew’s New York Times bestselling book of the same title, and it’s an incredible true story of courage and perseverance. Andrew is going to discuss the book with fellow New York Times bestselling author Ruta Sepetys at Parnassus on February 9th. You can check our online calendar for more upcoming events at http://www.parnassusbooks.net/event.

MUF: Many independent bookstores have store pets, but Parnassus has several wonderfully named dogs (Sparkman Vandevender or Sparky, Opie Breman, Belle Rock, Bear Gardner, Mary Todd Lincoln Coffman, and Eleanor Roosevelt Philpott), who not only greet customers but actually perform same-day delivery service?
Mary Laura
: Ha! Yes, that was their April Fool’s Day joke on us all last year. (https://parnassusmusing.net/2016/04/01/announcing-our-new-service-parnassus-on-paws/) Wouldn’t it be hilarious if the dogs could drive and they just showed up at people’s doorsteps? They actually serve a variety of functions in the store, from offering wet-nosed greetings to acting as furry footstools to snuggling anyone who looks like they need a little love. They also have their own blog, “Shop Dog Diaries,” where they share their bookstore adventures. (https://parnassusmusing.net/category/shop-dog-diaries/)

MUF:For those of us who can’t visit and enjoy Parnassus soon, tell us what we can experience online.
Mary Laura:
If you can’t be here in person, make sure you’re subscribed to Musing — it’s almost as good as visiting the store. You’ll get lots of exclusive, free bookish content delivered right to your inbox: author interviews, reading lists, staff reviews of new books, Ann’s blog, the shop dogs’ blog, and more. (www.ParnassusMusing.com) You can also shop directly from our store website, www.ParnassusBooks.net, and we’ll ship your books to you. One other thing far-away readers need to know about is our subscription programs. (http://www.parnassusbooks.net/first-edition-clubs) There are two, actually: the First Editions Club (a signed, hardcover, new adult book every month) and ParnassusNext (a new, signed YA book every month). And if you’re on FacebookTwitter, or Instagram, you can interact with us every day!

MUF: If a family visits your shop from out of town, would there be family-friendly places in the neighborhood where they could get a snack or meal? And if they can stay a little longer, are there some unique sites or activities nearby they shouldn’t miss?
Mary Laura
: Oh, Nashville is such a family-friendly town. Depending on the weather, there are lots of places right in the middle of the city to hike and enjoy the outdoors (check out Radnor Lake and Warner Parks). The Parthenon is pretty cool, as are the Nashville Zoo and Cheekwood Botanical Gardens. If you’re into science, the Adventure Science Center is worth checking out. There are some family-friendly activities at Opryland as well. As for food, well, we could go on forever . . . Andy Brennan, our store manager, strongly believes Martin’s Bar-B-Que Joint is the best in town. There are several spots right here in our shopping center, too, including Fox’s Donut Den right around the corner. Donuts and books, does it get better than that?

MUF:  Amen!  Thanks for telling us about Parnassus Books.  Readers, have you visited this delightful shop?  If not, wouldn’t you love to go there?

Sue Cowing is the author of the puppet-and-boy novel, You Will Call Me Drog (Carolrhoda 2011, Usborne UK 2012)

On the Road? Find a Bookstore

Having recently made a voyage to Ann Patchett’s Parnassus Books, I was tickled to see this week’s New York Times article, Ann Patchett’s Guide for Bookstore Pilgrims. Patchett is one of my favorite authors, and I had been dying to see her famous bookstore. I reveled in the light and airy feel, the healthy children’s book section, and the entire wall of signed copies of her new book, COMMONWEALTH. I came home with a few goodies.

My trip wasn’t a pilgrimage per se. I was visiting Nashville anyway, and made a stop in to the store. That’s one of my favorite things to do when traveling. There’s nothing like a good independent bookstore to get a feel for the unique personality of a town (the cookbook section and community message boards are particularly good for this). Wandering through a well-curated bookstore is also the perfect antidote for the disorientation of travel. I come out calm and refreshed, my bag filled with thought-provoking entertainment for the trip and gifts for those back home. And no matter where I am, I always find my people in a bookstore.

In the past year, I’ve discovered The Galaxy Bookshop in Hartwick, Vermont, and Sherman’s Books & Stationery in Portland, Maine. In Chicago, I found Andersonville’s Women and Children First, and in Baltimore, The Ivy Bookshop.

Patchett’s article has inspired me. I’m putting on my bucket list a trip to an independent bookstore in every state. Our Indie Spotlights are a great place to start. I’ll check in from time to time on my progress. In the meantime, I’d love to hear your stories of stumbled-upon or sought-out bookstores. I’ve got trips planned to Providence, Rhode Island; Philadelphia; and maybe Anchorage. Any recommendations?

Katharine Manning is a middle grade writer who is eager to visit your local bookstore. Until then, you can find her at www.katharinemanning.com, on Twitter, and on Instagram, where she posts lots of pictures of books and bookstores. Also cats. 

Indie Spotlight: Prairie Lights Books, Iowa City IA

prairie-lights-entrance
Sue Cowing for Mixed-Up Files: Today we’re talking with Sarah and Barb of the children’s department of Prairie Lights (www.prairielights.com), an independent bookstore in the heart of the reading and writing university town of Iowa City Iowa, designated a UNESCO City of Literature.
MUF: Your location and your close relationship with  the Iowa Writing Workshop gives your store a unique readers-and-writers atmosphere and clientele, doesn’t it?
PRAIRIE LIGHTS: It does! Because we host readings a few times a week, it means that young readers and writers have access to some of the top writers working today. It also means the young readers who come in sometimes want the latest trendy book, but they are often eager to see something different, to read outside their usual comfort zones.prairie-lights-kid-browsing

MUF: When a middle school-age boy or girl comes into your store, how do you help them connect with their next good book?
PRAIRIE LIGHTS: We ask them, “what was the last awesome book that you read?” and go from there. We fearlessly pull lots of books off the shelf and have fun talking about each one. Sometimes kids are hesitant to read a book recommended by a grown up, but we’re pretty good at matching great books with intrepid readers.prairie-lights-ashprairie-lights-ray
We display local authors’ books on a special shelf, featuring local middle grade authors Sarah Prineas and Delia Ray.   We have a current display and we create a book list in May for summer reading and November for holiday gift giving. Link: http://www.prairielights.com/pauls-corner/summer-children-teens-reading-list.prairie-lights-sea-to-silverprairie-lights-secret-keepers

prairie-lights-napoli
We also present titles on the Talk of Iowa show with Charity Nebbe on Iowa Public Radio.

MUF: I’m including here pictures of the covers of some titles on your lists.  You recently had a sellout appearance of Rick Riordan at Prairie Lights. Are there more readings, events or activities coming up over the holidays that would be of special interest to middle-graders?
PRAIRIE LIGHTS: Renowned author Lois Lowry is coming to the Englert prairie-lights-lowryTheater on November 16 , 2016. We are hosting a special evening on Wed. November 9 with Michelle Falkoff and Calla Devlin, who will read from their new YA novels.
In addition, because we are a UNESCO City of Literature we also have a Festival of Books for Children every year in February. Link: http://www.onebooktwobook.org/

MUF: How do you decide what titles to carry for ages eight to twelve?
PRAIRIE LIGHTS:Two people in the kids area prairie-lights-juando the ordering. They have good relationships with publisher’s reps and also read journals for reviews.

MUF: Prairie Lights’ collection is strong in poetry, and it’s good to see the increasing popularity of poetry and novels-in-verse with young readers. Do you and your customers have some favorites?
PRAIRIE LIGHTS: In our book lists/bibliographies we always include a poetry section, and we have a section of the kids are full of poetry books, both classics and new books. We think every family needs to read a poem aloud every day—like at the breakfast table, or before dinner.prairie-lights-poetry

MUF: What other titles, new and old, fiction and nonfiction do you find yourself recommending to middle-graders these days?prairie-lights-some-writer
PRAIRIE LIGHTS: Check out our booklist of new recommended titles, online: http://www.prairielights.com/pauls-corner/summer-children-teens-reading-list

MUF: If a family from out of town came to visit Prairie Lights, would there be family-friendly places in the neighborhood where the could get a meal or snack after shopping? And if they could stay beyond the day, are there some unique sights or family activities they shouldn’t miss?
PRAIRIE LIGHTS: We are just down the street from the Pedestrian Mall, where visitors will find unique little shops, frozen yogurt, an interactive water fountain, and a great playground, not to mention the Iowa City Public Library. In the other direction is the University of Iowa, featuring MacBride Hall and its natural history museum. There are lots of restaurants downtown, too, all easy walking distance.

Everyone shops at Prairie Lights!

Everyone shops at Prairie Lights!

 

Readers, whether you live nearby or are passing through, be sure to visit this great book store! And if you’re already a fan, please say hello in a comment.
Sue Cowing is the author of the puppet-and-boy novel, You Will Call Me Drog (Carolrhoda 2011, Usborne UK 2012)