Turning Kids Into Bookworms: A Book List For Parents

If you need some inspirational reading to help you turn your kids into story loving bookworms, here’s a list of seven to get you started.


 1. How to Get Your Child to Love Reading  Blending her experience as both a teacher and a parent with a passion for children’s literature, Codell presents this indispensable resource for parents that puts kids on the road to reading. Includes fun-filled activities that emphasize excitement and book recommendations on a variety of subjects.

 

2. Deconstructing Penguins “Books are like puzzles,” write Lawrence and Nancy Goldstone. “The author’s ideas are hidden, and it is up to all of us to figure them out.” In this indispensable reading companion, the Goldstones–noted parent-child book club experts–encourage grownups and young readers alike to adopt an approach that will unlock the magic and power of reading.

With the Goldstones help, parents can inspire kids’ lifelong love of reading by teaching them how to unlock a book’s hidden meaning. Featuring fun and incisive discussions of numerous children’s classics, this dynamic guide highlights key elements–theme, setting, character, point of view, climax, and conflict–and paves the way for meaningful conversations between parents and children.

 

3. The Kids’ Book Club Book 

The first complete guide-for use by adults and children-to creating fun and educational book clubs for kids.

As authors of The Book Club Cookbook, the classic guide to integrating great food and food-related discussion into book club gatherings, Judy Gelman and Vicki Levy Krupp hear a common refrain from parents, librarians, teachers, community leaders and kids themselves: “How about writing a book for kids’ book clubs?” Indeed, in recent years youth organizations, parents, libraries, schools, and our local, state, and federal governments have launched thousands of book clubs for children as a way to counter falling literacy rates and foster a love of reading. Based on surveys representing five hundred youth book clubs across the country and interviews with parents, kids, educators, and librarians, The Kids’ Book Club Book features:

_- the top fifty favorite book club reads for children ages eight to eighteen;
_- ideas and advice on forming great kids’ book clubs-and tips for kids who want to start their own book clubs;
_- recipes, activities, and insights from such bestselling children’s book authors as Christopher Paolini, Lois Lowry, Jerry Spinelli, Nancy Farmer, Christopher Paul Curtis, Andrew Clements, Laurie Halse Anderson, Norton Juster, and many others.





4. Best Books for Kids Who (Think They) Hate to Read Get Your Child Hooked on Books! Reading can become a favorite part of any child’s life—even children who think they hate to read. And, with the help of this unique book, it’s easy to put your reluctant reader on the path to becoming an enthusiastic reader. Inside are 125 books that are certain to ignite your child’s interest in reading. You’ll find a variety of titles with real kid appeal—the best of the best for children of all reading levels. These books will captivate your child’s interest and create a passion you never thought possible. So, for the love of reading and your child, come inside, explore all 125 books, and discover:
·Complete descriptions and synopses
·The appeal of each book to reluctant readers
·Suggested audience and reading levels
·Recommended readings if your child enjoys a particular book
·And much, much more!
By developing a love of reading and an emotional connection to books and ideas, your child can develop and maintain a high level of interest in reading—and get a head start on life.
“An excellent resource for parents and educators interested in promoting literacy among children, with practical tips on how to make reading a fun, educational, and rewarding experience for children of all ages.”
—Stephen Green, Ph.D., child development specialist, Texas A&M University


5. The Book Whisperer Donalyn Miller says she has yet to meet a child she couldn’t turn into a reader. No matter how far behind Miller’s students might be when they reach her 6th grade classroom, they end up reading an average of 40 to 50 books a year. Miller’s unconventional approach dispenses with drills and worksheets that make reading a chore. Instead, she helps students navigate the world of literature and gives them time to read books they pick out themselves. Her love of books and teaching is both infectious and inspiring. The book includes a dynamite list of recommended “kid lit” that helps parents and teachers find the books that students really like to read.


6. Read-Aloud Handbook For more than two decades, millions of parents and educators have turned to Jim Trelease’s beloved classic to help countless children become avid readers through awakening their imaginations and improving their language skills. Now this new edition of The Read-Aloud Handbook imparts the benefits, rewards, and importance of reading aloud to children of a new generation. Supported by delightful anecdotes as well as the latest research, The Read- Aloud Handbook offers proven techniques and strategies–and the reasoning behind them– for helping children discover the pleasures of reading and setting them on the road to becoming lifelong readers.



7. The Reading Promise When Alice Ozma was in 4th grade, she and her father decided to see if he could read aloud to her for 100 consecutive nights. On the hundreth night, they shared pancakes to celebrate, but it soon became evident that neither wanted to let go of their storytelling ritual. So they decided to continue what they called “The Streak.” Alice’s father read aloud to her every night without fail until the day she left for college.

Alice approaches her book as a series of vignettes about her relationship with her father and the life lessons learned from the books he read to her.

Books included in the Streak were: Great Expectations by Charles Dickens, the Oz books by L. Frank Baum, Harry Potter by J. K. Rowling, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll, and Shakespeare’s plays.

All book descriptions are courtesy of Indie-Bound.

One Response to Turning Kids Into Bookworms: A Book List For Parents

  1. I’m currently in my 3rd year of an ECSE degree, and we haven’t had any lectures on microcontrollers either. We’ve had one where we studied C, one on FPGAs, and another where we studied real time OSs, and several where we studied the basic theory behind digital processors, but nothing specific to microcontrollers.We have, however, had one unit where we told to design a robot, given an Arduino and some basic lectures on mechanics, H-bridges, etc., and told “go for it”.

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